Books I’ve Written

Bean Validation

Bean Validation took up a single chapter of my “Beginning Java EE 7” and was 34 pages long.
It was about Bean Validation 1.1. Since then, this specification has evolved towards a version 2.0 and I decided to add more content (bringing it to 90 pages).

Validating data is a common task that developers have to do and it is spread throughout all layers (from client to database) of an application. This common practice is time-consuming, error prone, and hard to maintain in the long run. In addition, some of these constraints are so frequently used that they could be considered standard (check for a null value, its size, its range etc.). It would be good to be able to centralize these constraints in one place and share them across layers. That’s when Bean Validation comes into play.
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Java EE 7

This book is a major update of the Beginning Java EE 6. All the chapters of existing specifications have been updated and two new chapters have been added (CDI and Bean Validation). This book starts by introducing Java EE 7 and some new language features of Java SE 7. Then follows 14 chapters introducing a technology (CDI 1.1, Bean Validation 1.1, JPA 2.1, EJB 3.2, JSF 2.2, XML and JSON processing, JMS 2.0, JAX-WS 2.3 and JAX-RS 2.0). Each chapter is illustrated with lots of code and UML diagrams and finishes with a Putting it all Together section, where you combine several Java EE 7 technologies to compose and application.
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Java EE 6

This book concentrates on Java EE 6 and highlights the new features of this release. It explores the innovations of this new version, and examines the various specifications and how to assemble them to develop applications. Java EE 6 consists of nearly 30 specifications and is an important milestone for the enterprise layer (EJB 3.1, JPA 2.0), for the web tier (Servlet 3.0, JSF 2.0), and for interoperability (SOAP web services and RESTful services). This book covers a broad part of the Java EE 6 specifications and uses the JDK 1.6 and some well-known design patterns, as well as the GlassFish application server, the Derby database, JUnit, and Maven. It is abundantly illustrated with UML diagrams, Java code, and screenshots.
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Java EE 5

The Java EE 5 book I’ve written is a practical book that tells you how to develop a e-commerce website using most of the Java EE 5 specifications. I uses a PetStore-like application to introduce EJB 3, JPA 1.0, JSF 1.2, JSP 2.1 and JMS. It’s written in French and is published by Eyrolles. To know more about it, click on the prefered language.
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En savoir plus

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